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Yarn Blog


Stop by weekly and learn more about knitting and crocheting. We will discuss different types of yarn. We will share information for fiber arts projects.  

Inaugural Local Yarn Day Event On April 21st From 10 AM-3PM

April 12, 2018

Calling all knitters and crocheters!

We know yarn stimulates your senses: soaking in the entire spectrum of color, sinking your fingers into decadent skeins of the softest fibers, settling into a cozy chair to page through the latest patterns. We also know the only place to get the full experience is in the store.

Come celebrate everything you love about yarn at our Local Yarn Store Day event, featuring many items from your favorite yarn companies and designers available only at brick-and-mortar local yarn shops. Have friends who'd like to learn more? Bring them along! Remember to check in on social media and share your excitement.

A Piece of Ewe
506 Columbus Avenue
April 21, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.



The Makin’ Bacon Food Truck will be on site. We will offer a $1 Bacon Buck to be used for food for every $10 you spend in our yarn store. 

Limit $5 Bacon Bucks per person. 

Makin’ Bacon Menu:

Whole Hog Special (WHS) choice of entree, side of bacon-topped Mac and Cheese, and a dessert 

Street Style Steak Sandwich 
A 5 ounce ball-tip steak, served on a Barney’s Bakery bun, with mayo, cheese, grilled onions, and bacon. $9.50 WHS $14.00

Street Style 1/4 pound Bratwurst, served on a Barney’s Bakery bun, with mayo, cheese, grilled onions, and bacon. $6.50 WHS $11.00

Street Style 1/4 pound All-Beef Dog, served on a Barney’s Bakery bun, with mayo, cheese, grilled onions, and bacon.
$6.50 WHS $11.00

Pulled Pork Sandwich
Slow roasted pulled pork, piled high on a fresh bun, topped with BBQ sauce $6.50 WHS $11.00

Pulled Pork Street Bowl
Creamy Mac and Cheese, topped with pulled pork, BBQ sauce, and grilled onions. Regular $6.50 Large $8.50 Add bacon $1.00

Five cheese, Bacon-Topped Mac and Cheese. Regular $4.50 Large $6.50 X-Large $8.50

Chocolate Bacon Brownie $2.00

Join us for a fun day with some baconlicious food, while supporting A Piece of Ewe!


On Hooks and Needles

April 9, 2018

It happens all the time. You’re sitting in a public space, hook in hand, and the voice of a stranger breaks through your reverie: “Hey! What are you knitting?” (Knitters’ work gets confused by non-yarnies, too, although maybe not as often.)

At this point, a discussion can become an enthusiastic, even spirited, defense of one needle art or the other, but what’s “better” tends to be determined by a stitchers’ personal history, aesthetic preference or range of comfortable physical motion – not to mention what kinds of projects they enjoy.

Knitting vs. Crocheting

Both arts have a lot going for them. Crochet’s textural interest and inherent sturdiness make for beautiful and practical versatility – the same stitches that create intricate lace also shape lovable toys and durable, trendy baskets and rugs. Building with a single stitch at a time gives the artisan ease of free-form design and more flexibility in sharing hooks among multiple projects. True, finding a great sweater pattern can be a challenge, and you do need to pay attention to US vs. British pattern language. But, overall, the projects work up quickly, and the coziness of a crocheted afghan on a chilly evening can’t be denied.

Knitting uses only two kinds of simple stitches to make rows of loops that interlock. Working with many loops at a time (instead of just one) creates a finer, softer fabric that lends itself more easily to modern-looking wearables – and the problem isn’t finding those patterns; it’s choosing which one to make first. Of course, working with so many live loops increases the opportunity for errors that may not be as easy to correct. However, the sheer number of knitting resources is staggering in comparison, and standardized pattern language minimizes confusion.

But why stay rooted in one spot?

Why should knitters learn to crochet?

Shaped edges clean up beautifully with a quick slip stitch border. Chained loops make great buttonholes, and that lace we mentioned earlier can take your work up several notches. Many knitters swear by using foundation chains for provisional cast-ons. And nothing picks up stitches – dropped or deliberately added – like a hook.

When would a crocheter use needles?

Your flowers and other appliques shine on a field of stockinette. Color work is possible with crochet, but you can tackle more intricate detail with knitted fabric. Good-looking socks can come off a hook, but their knitted cousins have the edge on stretch for an even more comfortable fit. Finally (for this post, at least), many stitchers alternate with knitting or even switch arts altogether because crochet’s repetitive motions caused discomfort or aggravated arthritis or other injury.

The real question isn’t which needle art is better – it’s which one suits your purpose today?